Archives for the month of: October, 2015

fall decorations from a farm

Fall Colors in the Hudson Valley

Traditionally, farm produce such as pumpkins, squash, hay bales and corn stalks are used to decorate houses and gardens.

There are still many small, family farms in the Hudson Valley that supply this produce at farm stands, local stores or farmers markets.

Fall decor - pumpkins and corn

Pumpkins and corn from Boice’s Farm in the Hudson Valley

One such farm is Boice’s Farm which is located in Saugerties. Their farm stand is on Kings Highway and they have a great selection of seasonal fruit, vegetables and flowers.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

They also have decorative pots and ornaments for the house and garden. All the flowers are very well-tended and look great even this late in the season.

millet grass

The farm house at Boice's Farm

The farm house at Boice’s Farm

They have a field of sunflowers next to the farm house and they sell the cut blooms.

A field of sunflowers

Sunflower field at Boice’s Farm

A sunflower in bloom

Late summer beauty

A dried sunflower full of seeds

A dried sunflower full of seeds is a great decorative item. Or hang it up outside for the birds to enjoy

Sue, the Manager of Boice’s Farm Stand explained that their farm started in 1947. In the beginning, they had problems obtaining the seedling plants for the farm so they built a greenhouse and started growing their own. This expanded into growing cut flowers. They also provide chrysanthemums for the Saugerties ‘Mum Festival’ and make Kissing Balls for the holidays.

Sweet corn growing in a corn field

You can’t beat local corn – so fresh and sweet!

There are about seven bee hives in the fields and Sue confirmed that there is an improvement in  the pollination of the pumpkin and squash due to the bee hives. “Bees have been around forever so why not keep them around?”.

Decorative fall items from a farm - chrysanthemums, squash and cabbage

A classic combo – chrysanthemums, squash, pumpkins and decorative cabbage

Boice’s Farm stand is open weekdays and weekends.

Buy local and support our family farms!

Decorative pumpkin, sweetcorn and chrysanthemum flowers

Corn, pumpkin and “Mums”

Hydrangea flowers, green squash piled up on a hay bale

Hydrangea flowers and green squash piled up on a hay bale


A baby Box Turtle

Baby Box Turtle. Picture by Catskill Native Nursery

This item is from the Facebook page of The Catskill Native Nursery, a nursery that specializes in trees, shrubs and pants that are native to New York and the US.

“While out on his morning dog walk, Francis noticed this baby box turtle enjoying the damp woods. A box turtle may live as long as a hundred years, all within a few acres. They are on the menu of various creatures, but their leading cause of death is habit destruction and encountering vehicles such as ATV’s, 4×4 off-road driving, cars and lawn mowers. If you want to help box turtle populations you should encourage their habitat that consists of moist soil (swamps, marsh, moist grasslands or damp forest depressions) and open meadows where they like to breed. Instead of trying to turn our forest floors into tidy parks by tossing down grass seed and removing all downed branches we should encourage the growth of ferns, sedges, partridge berry, wintergreen and low growing shrubs like mountain laurel, huckleberry and blueberry. Meadows are always better than “golf courses”, if you are a part of nature’s web. Box turtles are omnivores and eat insects, mushrooms, berries, and grubs. One of their favorite treats is the fruit of mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum). This is an easy to grow, deer resistant, self-spreading plant we encourage people to cultivate in their larger shade gardens and woodland understory.”

“Please don’t move box turtles unless you are saving them from danger. They do not want to be a pet. They are designed to be free-range little tanks fueling up on fungi, berries and bugs – and for making more baby box turtles. If we respect their wild spirit and their habitat they will continue to share our world, and future generations of humans can enjoy discovering them on their walks in the woods.”

Learn more about the Catskill Native Nursery here.

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