All is quiet…

For the past week or so, I have seen the tips of branches on trees turn brown due to the female cicadas laying their eggs in the bark. The female will scar the bark in order to lay eggs and sometimes this results in the branch tip breaking and falling to the ground.

Tree showing brown branch tips due to Cicada activity

Tree showing brown branch tips due to Cicada activity

There is noticably more branch debris on the ground compared to other years.

Tips of tree branches on ground due to Cicadas laying eggs in bark

Tips of tree branches on ground due to Cicadas laying eggs in bark

Oak tree twig showing scarring by cicada

Oak tree twig showing scarring by cicada

There are many cicada carcasses on the ground providing a feast for wildlife.

A feast for ants and chipmunks

A feast for ants and chipmunks

Dead cicadas are all over the place

Dead cicadas are all over the place

The volume of noise produced by the male Cicadas began to diminish during the last week in June, by the second week of July the noise ceased entirely. The adult cicadas are no longer visible on foliage, it appears that the adult phase of the Brood II Cicada is drawing to a close.

Just a note about the cicada life cycle: The females lay eggs in branches, the baby cicadas drop to the ground where they burrow into the earth. They grow bigger under ground, staying there for 17 years before emerging as nymphs. After emerging they shed their exoskeleton and become adult cicadas. The male cicadas produce the sound to attract females and the cycle begins again.

Exoskeletons left behind when nymphs became adult cicadas

Exoskeletons left behind when nymphs became adult cicadas

Cicadas mating, beleive it or not they can walk at the same time

Cicadas mating, believe it or not they can walk at the same time

Participate in a Cicada Tracker project and assist research scientist John Cooley and professor Chris Simon at the University of Connecticut Ecology & Evolutionary Biology department, who are conducting scientific research into the 2013 Brood II Cicada event. Cicada Tracker

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